Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.up.edu.ps/xmlui/handle/123456789/261
Title: Post and Core in Pediatric Dentistry
Authors: monia, Islam
Abu Helal, Yousef
Altalla, Husam
Keywords: Post
Core
Pediatric
Dentistry
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2017
Abstract: Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Early childhood caries (ECC) involves the upper anterior teeth, most of the coronal structure would have been lost. Until recently, the extraction of the affected primary anterior teeth was the common treatment option for ECC, which results in unattractive appearance and could interfere with the personality and behavioral development of the child. Moreover, the early loss of primary anterior teeth results in reduced masticatory efficiency, loss of vertical dimension, development of parafunctional habits including tongue thrusting, speech problems, malocclusion and space loss. The esthetic restoration of severely mutilated anterior primary teeth has been for long a challenge to a pediatric dentist, not only because of the available materials and techniques, but also from the point of view of pediatric patients, who are usually among the youngest and least manageable group. Inadequate esthetic options in addition to the severity of the condition have prompted extraction in most of the cases, in spite of the treatment being not convincing both to the parents as well as the clinicians. In cases where teeth are severely decayed, endodontic treatment and placement of some retentive features is necessary before crown reconstruction. Some authors suggest using anterior stainless steel crowns with or without labial facing for full crown coverage of incisors that have lost an appreciable amount of their tooth structure, whereas some describe the resin post and core provided with orthodontic wire. Anterior primary teeth, when grossly decayed, lack a coronal structure, leading to decreased support and adhesion for a composite crown. Hence, use of a resin-based composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers is preferred and the technique is referred to as the 'short post technique' which requires root canal treatment and a short composite post. One of the most important considerations in reconstruction of primary teeth is the physiologic root resorption. Therefore, in most cases, the dentist should consider almost 3-4 mm of the existing root for obtaining enough retention and resistance of the severely damaged tooth restoration.
Description: Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Early childhood caries (ECC) involves the upper anterior teeth, most of the coronal structure would have been lost. Until recently, the extraction of the affected primary anterior teeth was the common treatment option for ECC, which results in unattractive appearance and could interfere with the personality and behavioral development of the child. Moreover, the early loss of primary anterior teeth results in reduced masticatory efficiency, loss of vertical dimension, development of parafunctional habits including tongue thrusting, speech problems, malocclusion and space loss. The esthetic restoration of severely mutilated anterior primary teeth has been for long a challenge to a pediatric dentist, not only because of the available materials and techniques, but also from the point of view of pediatric patients, who are usually among the youngest and least manageable group. Inadequate esthetic options in addition to the severity of the condition have prompted extraction in most of the cases, in spite of the treatment being not convincing both to the parents as well as the clinicians. In cases where teeth are severely decayed, endodontic treatment and placement of some retentive features is necessary before crown reconstruction. Some authors suggest using anterior stainless steel crowns with or without labial facing for full crown coverage of incisors that have lost an appreciable amount of their tooth structure, whereas some describe the resin post and core provided with orthodontic wire. Anterior primary teeth, when grossly decayed, lack a coronal structure, leading to decreased support and adhesion for a composite crown. Hence, use of a resin-based composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers is preferred and the technique is referred to as the 'short post technique' which requires root canal treatment and a short composite post. One of the most important considerations in reconstruction of primary teeth is the physiologic root resorption. Therefore, in most cases, the dentist should consider almost 3-4 mm of the existing root for obtaining enough retention and resistance of the severely damaged tooth restoration.
URI: http://dspace.up.edu.ps/xmlui/handle/123456789/261
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